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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 483 (some duplicates have been removed)
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
to space to stem-cell research to name a few. can science stay objective out of politics? alex is co-author of science left behind, feel good fallacies in the rise of the anti-scientific left. welcome. >> thank you for having me on. >> sure. you argue here that for all of the talk about republicans being the enemy of science, anti-scientific rhetoric is a by partisan project. tell me how you came to this opinion that democrats are not necessarily the party of science. >> well, on a whole host of issues, so as you know, on the right the conservatives are wrong on evolution and on climate change, and there's this it media narrative that somehow anti-science believes are unique to the right side of the political spectrum. what i found through reading a lot of science is basically that the left side also has some pet ideas not lining up with the scientific mainstream. for instance, opposition to genetic modification. the california democratic party endorsed this proportion to label food in direct opposition to the american medical association. the anti-vaccine movement started on the lef
the best workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need atat our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in hf and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's,and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack oma and i approve this message. >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5:00, on your side. >> today marks the tenures since the terrifying day when there was a shooting -- today marks 10 years since th
science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and then not messages that are speaking to a far broader size
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable and n
very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials wanted to believe the vendors over us because the vendors assured them everything is safe. >> rose: and there was your appointment to the international workshop on international voting president clinton, this book ki
government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming president obama for that when it is exactly this side that has made the kind of recovery we need so fleeting and evanescent. we need a strong recovery, but the policies he is recommending would be the opposite of
see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than
science team. increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. used to be to the extension of data it was left for fund-raising or you could buy vendors our consultants. and now, you know, people will have call them different things but there's basically the core function of a modern campaign to people, especially on the photo site, just crushing and processing data. >> if any of us were to go to the romney campaign or the obama campaign and where to look around the headquarters, how many people, is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago, dozens of people depending i had how you define it, analytics him and then in every state they are hiring for jobs that are dated jobs, voter file managers, targeting directors, that's, you, the obama campaign will have thousands around the country and i guess hundreds of them are directly interacting with the data everyday. >> host: do you think one of the parties, republicans or the democrats, is more adept at using this technique? or are they all sort of at the same level? >> guest:
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
. ">>>politcal science honor society pi sigma alpha welcomed members, alumni, professors and students to the hilton hotel in downtown san jose to watch and discuss the presidential debate. society president sol jobrack was happy to see the large turnout. sol "they kind of like their candidates and hopefully this event can swing them either way." vice president ryan brewer saw this debate as a pivotal point for mitt romney and wants to see the republican take the oval office this fall. brewer "if you look at history, no president has ever won reelection with unemployment over 7.4%. today we are over eight, and i think that speaks a lot to people like me, a student thats going to be graduating in the future. i want to see someone who is good for the economy and good for my wallet." former pi sigma alpha president donna spencer is confident in president obama's plan. she thinks he is deserving of the second term in office and was excited to see the president defeat the opposition. donna "i'm here to watch the first presidential debate because i think its important that we're able to watc
, mathematics and science and you have a new book called "why does the world exist: an existential detective story." >> you say that sarcastically. (laughter) >> stephen: that's as sincere as i get. (laughter) first question: why does world exist exist? (laughter) what led you to write this book? >> good question. i was raised in a very religious family. >> stephen: what kind? >> catholic. >> stephen: how religious were you? >> i said the rosary. i did--. >> stephen: basic stuff, basic stuff. >> i confessed my sins. >> stephen: are you still catholic? >> no. >> stephen: well then how religious could your family have been? evidently they failed. >> yeah, they told me this story that the world exists because god--. >> stephen: in the beginning. >> exactly. there's already a book about that, by the way. (laughter) so you listened and then at some point you said i don't buy it. >> i began to have doubts and i want to know why the universe exists. if there's a reason i want to know that and god might be the reason, you may believe that but you know,--. >> stephen: you should care about this myste
dignitaries cut a piece of crime scene tape to officially open the new lab. >> forensic sciences will specialize particularly in dna testing, firearms and fingerprints and will have a fully functioning public health lab as well. >> reporter: gone are the days when evidence collected from rape victims sat on shelves untested and dna from cold cases went unanalyzed. >> it was a lot of work and i lot of advocacy. but can i tell you why i'm really here? i'm here for the moms of homicide victims who they labored so long and so hard to try to get this lab built and victims of sexual assault who were victimized twice when their rape kits weren't tested. >> reporter: kathy patterson help put the lab's initial pieces in place. first two floors of the building house the crime lab where firearms will be tested and fingerprints examined. the dna lab, which for the last two years occupied space in lorton, now has a permanent home. an entire floor will house the city's morgue where autopsies will be done. there is even a toxicology lab. >> to reduce this to what it is all about, it is more lik
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
jose and among those, political science professors. i think mitt romney did a great job, obama looked a little off his game. i think mitt romney did a better job tonight. >> i think the winner is the president because he is the president and his opponent has to be able to say why he should be better than the incumbent and i don't think that was necessarily done tonight. >> and a debate feels 6 5% feels mitt romney won compared to 2 5% for the president. and 48% for mitt romney, compared to 2 5% for the president. >>> and fact statements you will find that on our website www.ktvu.com. >>> they will replace the death penalty with life in prison without parole. here are the -- here is the news about that. >>> and there is a dispute that happened in the city of glenn cove neighborhood. ktvu channel 2 morning news wopping wong joins us with more about the man accused of opening fire on neighbors. >> he said the sister martin he is a former marine and you can see the marine flag flying out in front of his home. the home of the toe people he shot was vallejo. i want to show you video as the
and that it will not be in or out and states have to prepare right now . that costs money. >> it feels like a high school science project throw in the baking soda and soda and right in the taxpayer's face. medicaid and medicare are rising by 17 trillion over 75 years due to health reform. a quarter of the state's budget is toward medicaid . medicaid part of the budget rising x. four times faster. >> mark, even the democratic governors are worried. governor cuomo is saying that he doesn't have all of the cash necessary to set up the exchanges that are part of the whole plan and what are they going to do? these states are strap asked they don't have the money? >> this is covered by the federal government. >> oh, yeah, how? >> they said they are going to pay it. >> is money coming down from heaven to pay this? >> they are paying 100 percent. >>> and that's how we worry? >> you are suggesting that you throw the people by the road side and let them die. >> of course not. >> and the facts is that there is a possibility of that? >> people are not dying on the streets . >> not yet. but soon. >> we can survive with our c
's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointeted d in the expectations that he has for himself. >> tonight the anticipation growing, about the one and only debate between the vice-presidential nominee. gas prices may be high in your hometown, but they just hit a record in one state, and keep climbing. could what's driving up the cost in california happen closer to you? and a driver plows right into a liquor store, whoa. imagine being one of the people inside. and watching that struck get away. ♪ >> i'm harris falkner, we begin tonight in florida, with the republican presidential nominee for president spending a third straight day in that state which is up for grabs. governor mitt romney at an earlily in port st. lucie and he has a major address on foreign policy tomorrow at the virginia military institute and then the governor making a promise about taxes. >> a study came out this week that showed with all his spending, and all of his borrowing and all the interest on at that debt, that he will ultimately have to raise taxes on middle income families by 4,000 a y
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
of political science students. the president's own staff tonight said romney won the debate when it came to style points gop the students there agree? >> for the most part, yes, they do agree. about 120 political sciences students came here to watch the debate along with some professors and some alumni. the general consensus was romney had a slight edge over the president in terms of his performance at the debate tonight. >> two rebuild america. >> more effective. more charismatic. >> i will lower taxes on middle income families. >> governor romney held his own. actually, i was surprised. >> reporter: after the debate was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room felt that romney had won. >> romney did a great job in presenting himself in like a very positive way. even though, like, the answers that obama gave were very pro democratic, pro public education. >> overall, romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> this way it's his do or die moment. >> reporter: melinda jackson says ro
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
. >>time for today's trivia. what is the science of brewing beer called? a. zorology b. zymurgy c. zumology the answer still to come this midday! winning lottery numbers. winning pick 3 numbers. 569 pick 4 winning numbers. 71,9,3 mega millions 36 million dollars. get yourself a ticket.ñóxó÷?÷?@?@? ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. a new study found that free birth control may dramatically reduce the number of teen pregnanices and abortions. the study looked at more than nine thousand girls and women at risk for unintended pregnancy in the saint louis area. researchers found over three years, that both abortions and teen births
ad campaign that has an animal rights agenda. it's not based on science. >> there's absolutely no biological reason for any human or mammal to drink milk after weaning and certainly the milk of another species. it's completely out of the ordinary and therefore there's really no biological reason to do it. >> reporter: okay, so obviously strong sentiments that is on both sides of this debate, including whether the latest science shows milk helps prevent bone fractures or not. what do you think about milk as a school lunch program? voice your opinion on our wusa 9 facebook page. >> i think it would be tough to put pinto beans on your lucky charms. i'm just saying. >>> we get a lot of mail from viewers. a tv anchor in wisconsin had to speak up after one viewer attacked her for being overweight. jennifer livingston got an e- mail from a man who said her size wasn't a suitable example for the community's young people and the letter went viral after her husband, a fellow anchor, posted it online. she addressed her rude viewer on the air today and anybody else who may be the victim of
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 483 (some duplicates have been removed)

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